Author: Caitlin Hull

Caitlin Hull

As an associate in Dorsey’s Trial Group, Caitlin utilizes strategic, creative thinking to represent clients in a variety of complex business cases and commercial disputes, including matters before both state and federal courts. She believes that communication is key to efficiently and effectively resolving disputes. In addition, Caitlin is committed to an active pro bono practice.

View Full Bio on Dorsey

Granston Memo in Action: Eighth Circuit Affirms Government Dismissal of FCA Claims Related to Minnesota Bridge Collapse

Caitlin Hull

Just days after the twelfth anniversary of the Minnesota 35W bridge collapse, the Eighth Circuit summarily affirmed the dismissal of a False Claims Act case alleging that Minnesota government officials conspired to submit false claims and obtain $250 million in federal funding. United States ex rel. Davis v. Hennepin Cty., No: 19-2298 (8th Cir. Aug. 14, 2019). Focused on the aftermath of the 35W bridge...

Supreme Court Settles Circuit Split and Reads the False Claims Act Statute of Limitations Provision Broadly in Boon to Relators

Caitlin Hull

On May 13, 2019, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Cochise Consultancy, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Hunt, No. 18–325, and resolved a circuit split regarding the statute of limitations for an FCA claim brought by a relator between six and ten years after a violation, but less than three years after the government knew or should have known the relevant facts. The Court held...

Tribal Employees Cannot Shake FCA Claims Pleaded with Particularity When Sued in Their Personal Capacities

Caitlin Hull

Seven years after filing their initial complaint, a Montana federal court ruled that plaintiffs’ FCA action—at least on some claims and against some defendants—may finally proceed. Cain v. Salish Kootenai Coll., Inc., No. CV-12-181-M-BMM, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 26955 (D. Mont. Feb. 20, 2019). In 2012, plaintiffs, as relators in a qui tam action, alleged that a tribal college, its board of directors, and various...

Two Recent Justice Department Memoranda May Have Significant Consequences for Pending and Future False Claims Act Enforcement

Caitlin Hull

In recent weeks, the United States Department of Justice (“DOJ”) issued two memoranda that might change the calculus of False Claims Act (“FCA”) cases.  The memoranda at a minimum provide organizations with new—or at least invigorated—defenses to qui tam actions and civil enforcement matters. First, on January 10, Michael Granston, Director of DOJ’s Civil Frauds section, issued a memorandum encouraging DOJ trial attorneys to consider dismissing...